NorsePony's Mead Hall

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Posts tagged "music"

jessidork:

handsome-squidward:

gameandwatch:

natsugay:

For all of you that believe that vulgarity in music is only from contemporary times then just remember that mozart wrote a song called lick my ass

Proof for those of us that are unaware

I’m crying listen to it

ohmygod

(via tuiteyfruityundead)

This bootleg made by DJ HKT! :P
Download Now!!
http://www.mediafire.com/?1e4minixkkgd0dm

Some J-Pop happy hardcore. More Getting Shit Done music.

Hell to the yes. New Foozogz. 171 BPM of happy hardcore. Music For Doing Shit, I S2G.

emmilions:

Daft Punk’s song ‘Da Funk’ mashed up with the theme from the game ‘Professor Layton and the Curious Village’, composed by Tomohito Nishiura and performed by the Grand Caravan Orchestra

holy SHIT I can’t BREATHE oH MY GOD LISTEN TO THIS

(via tuiteyfruityundead)

gaytable:

nepeasant:

nepeasant:

niccage-official:

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A

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Of A

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You Do The

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AND

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VERY VERY

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i dont get it

NEVERMIND I GET IT NOW I’M STUPID

don’t even try to pretend you didn’t sing it in your head

(via tuiteyfruityundead)

stevencrewniverse:

"Heart of the Pyramid" from Serious Steven.
Composed by Aivi & Surasshu.

archiemcphee:

Cartoon Network Africa put together this awesome mashup of “The Fox” by Ylvis (previously featured here) and Adventure Time. It’s a match made in internet meme heaven.

[via Geekosystem]

kherpalazzo:

queenofcandyland:

ironturian:

kaiba-cave:

amymexy:

twinarmaggedons:

andrewscottland:

PSY vs Ke$ha vs LMFAO vs BIG TIME RUSH - Gangnam Blow

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HOW

JUST HOW

HOW DOES THIS WORK

im kinda impressed with this 

I freaking love finding these things on here. Thank goodness for Tum Taster.

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… what the hell… this is… holy… what…

That’s what happens when you take 4 songs with standard chord progressions (or lack thereof in a non-progressive loop), 4/4 time signatures (otherwise known as common time due to how common it is), an RPM common in club music, and vocals using similar pitches or spoken and mix em together

This is by all means not a bad thing; on the contrary, this is rather awesome. It takes some creative know-how to do this properly, and the op of the song definitely has it

(via tuiteyfruityundead)

phantasrs:

yourclothesarered:

whispythewriter:

drummergirl1701:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 

Everyone else go home

Ive got a good one. We had ffff on a percussion part, which is bad because we go nuts. Well, it was on the bass drum part, and our bass drum has wheels on the stand so we can roll it places and if you dont put the brakes on, the slightest hit will launch it a few feet. Well sure enough, the guy playing it forgot to put the brakes on during the concert. So, he hits it with all of his might. I looked up and saw it flying across the stage at me during a snare roll and thats the story of how i got knocked over during a concert by a bass drum.

I have ffff at the end of 1st Suite in Eb. It’s very very fun (except when i crack my note).

I once saw a percussion player try to end a piece on a ffff gong note. The gong fell over.

i was playing chimes and i was directed to play softer and softer until i just didn’t play and yes, i apparently sounded perfect at that point

(via tuiteyfruityundead)

stevencrewniverse:

"That’s Unusual!" from Frybo. The record scratching is meant to represent the jeans’ fabric!

Composed by Aivi & Surasshu

Funky.

Stampede (Save The Rave & EH!DE Remix)

Yesss, this pleases me.

This song makes me happy.

stevencrewniverse:

Together Breakfast - "Drop the Strawberry" 

Composers Aivi and Surasshu say:

Made with wub. Wubbingly crafted. …We’ll see ourselves out now.

This music made me laugh every time.

elhuesudoii:

lcgccx:

themelancholyhill:

  • Leonardo Da Vinci’s wacky piano is heard for the first time, after 500 years:

A bizarre instrument combining a piano and cello has finally been played to an audience more than 500 years after it was dreamt up Leonardo da Vinci.

Da Vinci, the Italian Renaissance genius who painted the Mona Lisa, invented the ‘‘viola organista’’ - which looks like a baby grand piano – but never built it, experts say.

 

The viola organista has now come to life, thanks to a Polish concert pianist with a flair for instrument-making and the patience and passion to interpret da Vinci’s plans.

 

Full of steel strings and spinning wheels, Slawomir Zubrzycki’s creation is a musical and mechanical work of art.

‘‘This instrument has the characteristics of three we know: the harpsichord, the organ and the viola da gamba,’’ Zubrzycki said as he debuted the instrument at the Academy of Music in the southern Polish city of Krakow.

The instrument’s exterior is painted in a rich midnight blue, adorned with golden swirls painted on the side. The inside of its lid is a deep raspberry inscribed with a Latin quote in gold leaf by 12th-century German nun, mystic and philosopher, Saint Hildegard.

 

‘‘Holy prophets and scholars immersed in the sea of arts both human and divine, dreamt up a multitude of instruments to delight the soul,’’ it says.

The flat bed of its interior is lined with golden spruce. Sixty-one gleaming steel strings run across it, similar to the inside of a baby grand.

Each is connected to the keyboard, complete with smaller black keys for sharp and flat notes. But unlike a piano, it has no hammered dulcimers. Instead, there are four spinning wheels wrapped in horse-tail hair, like violin bows.

 

To turn them, Zubrzycki pumps a pedal below the keyboard connected to a crankshaft. As he tinkles the keys, they press the strings down onto the wheels, emitting rich, sonorous tones reminiscent of a cello, an organ and even an accordion.

The effect is a sound that da Vinci dreamt of, but never heard; there are no historical records suggesting he or anyone else of his time built the instrument he designed.

A sketch and notes in da Vinci’s characteristic inverted script is found in his Codex Atlanticus, a 12-volume collection of his manuscripts and designs for everything from weaponry to flight.

 

‘‘I have no idea what Leonardo da Vinci might think of the instrument I’ve made, but I’d hope he’d be pleased,’’ said Zubrzycki, who spend three years and 5000 hours bringing da Vinci’s creation to life.

This is amazing.

"wacky piano"