NorsePony's Mead Hall

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brigettebrigettebrigette:

moon, mars, mercury, venus, jupiter!  

(via steveholtvstheuniverse)

bioticbootyshaker:

drtanner:

missmokushiroku:

thegamingmuse:

all-four-cheekbones:

n-o-r-m-a-n-d-y:

nothing makes a gamer more nervous than when the game autosaves in a seemingly harmless location

"this is an awfully convenient collection of healing items"

"why is all this ammo here"

"where did all the enemies go"

"This room has rather a lot of wide, open space in it." 

"The music stopped suddenly."

"No, there it is."

"….That’s an awful lot of bass."

(via ursulavernon)

pluckyyoungdonna:

orangepenguino:

kerrypolka:

First I know nothing about Marvel comics: all my context I got from the films Thor (delightful) and Avengers Assemble (remember very little except it had good jokes and the final action scene was too long), and reading The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay.

I went to see Captain America: The Winter Soldier last night because of this which I saw a few people reblog:

image

image

image

(okay and also all the gifsets of Sebastian Stan crying. I WAS MIS-SOLD ON THIS FOR THE RECORD, THERE IS LITTLE TO NO CRYING AND ALSO HIS HAIR IS AWFUL.)

If Kavalier and Clay taught me anything it’s threesomes are the best solutions to love triangles Jewish-American cartoonists in the 1930s and early ’40s were all over inventing subversively American heroes to fight Hitler, and I was very unsurprised when I got home and looked it up to learn that Captain America was created by two Jewish guys too. (I know this is really basic comics history stuff and I’m sure fifty people have written dissertations on “He’s A Mensch: The Jewish Identities of Captain America and Superman” or whatever.) What really slotted everything into place was realising that Captain America was created and entered on a cover punching Hitler in the face before America had entered the war.

Basically (right?) Captain America was created by two Jewish-Americans to shame the US into properly fighting Hitler.

Like, I am Captain America, the America you say you want to be, and I challenge you to put your money where your mouth is and actually do something about it. And yes he’s over-the-top and tacky but that’s where the challenge is, right? The chest-thumping American patriotism says “We are good and spread liberty! And also freedom!” and Captain America is like “great! I am that, and I have to point out you are not actually doing that”.

AND I think this is Jewishly on purpose, and here’s why:

Judaism has this important phrase/concept/slogan/life motto from the third-century-ish text Pirkei Avot, which goes: Lo alecha hamlacha ligmor (it’s not to you to complete the work of repairing the world) v’lo atah ben chorin l’hivatel mimena (but neither may you desist from it). You won’t be able to fix the world by yourself, or in your lifetime, but that doesn’t absolve you of responsibility to work towards it.

I feel like grimdark/anti-heroes are a response to the fact that the world is neither good nor moral, like “well if the world isn’t like that, I won’t be either”. But they’re also excuses for not working towards fixing the world: I won’t bother because it’s all fucked anyway. Lo alecha and Captain America say, yes, it is fucked, but you still have to work towards fixing it. And yes, it’s hard, that’s why it’s called work.

Which is why I think saying “Oh, if Captain America represents the US he should be a dick, because the US is a dick” or “Captain America is an imperialist symbol of US superiority and is therefore bad” are both off base and a dodge of having to do that hard work.  

"If Cap = America then Cap = dick because America = dick" is basically just throwing hands up and going "right but guys have you noticed that actually America is imperialist and horrible? DO YOU SEE?!” and implying “so what can you do about that, right?”. Captain America says, “Try to make it better! is what you can do!”

And about saying he’s a symbol of US imperial superiority, I mean, he is a symbol of America but aimed as a criticism at real America.  He’s the American ideal cranked up to five million - for the purpose of shaming America for not living up to what it says it wants to be. And he is aimed at Americans, so I can see a criticism for him being US-centric in that metanarrative sense, but he’s yelling at America to sort their shit out and I think him yelling at non-USAmericans to sort their shit out would be much worse? But I definitely don’t think Cap is supposed to be about how great America is, he’s about pointing out exactly in what ways and how much America is failing to be great. And then saying “but, that doesn’t mean you get out of trying harder!”

Also, how great is it that his ‘weapon’ is a shield.

so um that’s what I thought about when I saw The Winter Solder last night. that and biceps.

This is amazing on so many levels and also makes me want to have a special fandom-centric Shvi’i shel Pesach/seventh night of Passover virtual seder table on Tumblr to talk about the intersections of Judaism and popular culture with food and media crit and discussions of the diaspora.  ALSO everyone should read The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.

THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS 

(via tuiteyfruityundead)

archiemcphee:

German-born artist Gabby Wormann uses painstaking care to combine the delicate bodies of animals such as tarantulas, crabs and winged insects with intricate clockwork mechanisms to create beautiful creatures which she calls MeCre, or mechanical creatures.

"Wormann is interested in humanity’s intervention into complex biological systems, and her work postulates the hybrid forms’ role in the future. To the artist, they symbolize a synthesis between biomass and mechanics that will become part of our evolution. These creatures are more resistant, efficient, and technically optimized for a world where we are focused on continually improving at all costs."

Visit Gabby Wormann’s wesbite to check out more of her remarkable MeCre creations.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

thefrogman:

Photograph by David Haring at Duke Lemur Center

thefrogman:

Photograph by David Haring at Duke Lemur Center

jkottke:

American favorites (blue jeans, whiskey, burgers) have been embraced by the Japanese, who have been turning out improved versions of the originals.

In Japan, the ability to perfectly imitate-and even improve upon-the cocktails, cuisine and couture of foreign cultures isn’t limited to American products; there are spectacular French chefs and masterful Neapolitan pizzaioli who are actually Japanese. There’s something about the perspective of the Japanese that allows them to home in on the essential elements of foreign cultures and then perfectly recreate them at home. “What we see in Japan, in a wide range of pursuits, is a focus on mastery,” says Sarah Kovner, who teaches Japanese history at the University of Florida. “It’s true in traditional arts, it’s true of young people who dress up in Harajuku, it’s true of restaurateurs all over Japan.”

It’s easy to dismiss Japanese re-creations of foreign cultures as faddish and derivative-just other versions of the way that, for example, the new American hipster ideal of Brooklyn is clumsily copied everywhere from Paris to Bangkok. But the best examples of Japanese Americana don’t just replicate our culture. They strike out, on their own, into levels of appreciation and refinement rarely found in America. They give us an opportunity to consider our culture as refracted through a foreign and clarifying prism.

Another example, not mentioned in the piece, is coffee. From the WSJ a couple of years ago:

"My boss won’t let me make espressos," says the barista. "I need a year more, maybe two, before he’s ready to let customers drink my shots undiluted by milk. And I’ll need another whole year of practice after that if I want to be able to froth milk for cappuccinos."

Only after 18 years as a barista in New York did his boss, the cafe’s owner, feel qualified to return home to show off his coffee-making skills. Now, at Bear Pond’s main branch, he stops making espressos at an early hour each day, claiming that the spike on the power grid after that time precludes drawing the voltage required for optimal pressure.

archiemcphee:

Our newest inductee to the Department of Awesome Parenting is Beau Coffron, aka Lunchbox Dad, a San Francisco-based father who creates extraordinary lunchbox meals for his two children every week. These lunches are lots of fun to look while also being tasty, healthy meals for the lucky kids who actually get to eat them. Coffron draws inspiration for his homemade boxed lunches from movies and other pop cultures sources. He also takes requests from his son and daughter.

You can see many more of these awesome meals at the Lunchbox Dad website, where Coffron also provides extensive write-ups for each lunch, including ingredients and how-tos.

[via Design Taxi]

jkottke:

For the past couple of months, Amit Gupta has been playing around with taking moving self-portraits with a camera mounted on a drone. Here’s an early effort. This past weekend, Amit’s efforts crossed over into the realm of art. This is beautiful:

In the comments at Vimeo, Alex Dao dubbed this type of photograph a “dronie”. We’ll see if that catches on.

I thought it was going to be drones taking pictures of themselves. I’m not sure whether I’m disappointed or not.

archiemcphee:

Brazilian illustrator Gabriel Picolo is just over 100 days into an awesome art project called 365-DaysofDoodles. It’s exactly what it sounds like - Picolo is drawing something new in one of his Moleskine sketchbooks every day for a year. However these are some of the finest “doodles” we’ve ever seen.

Each drawing is unique and often inspired by some sort of pop culture source, featuring his own version of characters from anime, tv, movies and fine art.

Click here to view all of the daily doodles that Picolo has created thus far and then be sure to check back to watch him update the project.

[via Design Taxi]

St. John’s Asylum (Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum). Lincolnshire, England.

(via forbiddenplaces)

wyrmeguy:

I finally did Amethyst! I have a new found respect for those that have to animate her hair. I’ll do a master post with all the gems (and a little extra) soon :)

wyrmeguy:

I finally did Amethyst! I have a new found respect for those that have to animate her hair. I’ll do a master post with all the gems (and a little extra) soon :)

(via dearprofessorcelestia)

Abandoned factory, Italy.

(via forbiddenplaces)

Abandoned barn. Nova Scotia, Canada.

(via forbiddenplaces)